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No Pets at Apartment Communities and Condominium Associations

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

Are “No Pet” properties a thing of the past?

Before I give my opinion, let me first say I am just a hard working property manager managing condominium associations, apartment communities, and vacation rentals in Panama City and Tallahassee, I am not an attorney.  If you want or need legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

We’ve recently had four or five prospective Vacation Rental Guests and Long Term Resident Prospects say that their pet is not a pet but an Emotional Support Animal.

How is a Rental Manager or Condominium Association Manager who manages at a property that has a “no pet” policy supposed to respond when they are told by a prospective Guest or Resident that their pet is a Service Animal or an Emotional Support Animal?

Carefully!  Do not immediately just say “no pets”.

The Fair Housing Act (FHA), including both the Federal FHA and the Florida FHA, covers almost all condominiums and rental housing and short term rentals do not appear to be excluded.

Under the Fair Housing Act, a Manager is required to allow Assistance Animals even if the property has a “no pet” policy.  Assistance Animals include Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals.  For an animal to be considered an Assistance Animal under the Fair Housing Act, first the prospective Guest or Resident or someone in the Guest’s or Resident’s household must have a disability.  If there is no disability – there is no Assistance Animal.  Second, for an animal to be considered an Assistance Animal there must be an identifiable relationship between the disability and the function the animal provides.

Assistance Animals are not pets and are not subject to “no pet” rules or to any pet fees, extra pet rent, or pet deposits.  Assistance Animals do not have to have any special training and do not need any certification.

The first question to ask yourself is “Is the disability obvious?”.

If the disability is obvious, for instance if the Prospect is blind or deaf or anything else that is clearly obvious, and the animal obviously helps with the disability, you should accept that the animal is an Assistance Animal.  You should not ask any questions about their disability.

The Manager’s problem is almost always when the disability is not obvious.

A Rental Prospect is in your office and does not have an obvious disability but says their animal is an Emotional Support Animal and is not a pet.

Again, respond carefully! Do not immediately just say “no pets”.

If the disability is not obvious, according to HUD, Managers are entitled to verify the existence of a disability and the need for the Emotional Support Animal. Persons who are seeking a reasonable accommodation for an Emotional Support Animal may be required to provide documentation from a physician, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional that the animal provides support that alleviates at least one of the identified symptoms or effects of the disability such as relieves depression and anxiety, and/or helps reduce stress induced pain.

Are “No Pet” properties a thing of the past?  I think they probably will be in a few years.

HUD seems to think that their rules and interpretations do not create ambiguity and that not just any tenant will be able to allege a right to keep any pet as an Assistance Animal.  I think it is too easy to get someone to write a letter saying that an Emotional Support Animal is needed.  I believe we will see more and more abuse of the Emotional Support Animal until the “no pet” rules are a thing of the past.

In the mean-time our Managers might use a form that contains the following:

******************************************************************************

Request For Reasonable Accommodation For Emotional Support Animal

□   I am requesting that I be allowed to keep an Emotional Support Animal in my rental.

Is your Emotional Support Animal required because of a disability as defined in the Fair Housing Act?

□   Yes, I or someone in my household has a disability as defined in the Fair Housing Act:

Disability means a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities; a record of such an impairment; or being regarded as having such an impairment. This term does not include current, illegal use of or addiction to a controlled substance.

As used in this definition:

(a) Physical or mental impairment includes:

(1) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: Neurological; musculoskeletal; special sense organs; respiratory, including speech organs; cardiovascular; reproductive; digestive; genito-urinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine; or

(2) Any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities. The term physical or mental impairment includes, but is not limited to, such diseases and conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech and hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection, mental retardation, emotional illness, drug addiction (other than addiction caused by current, illegal use of a controlled substance) and alcoholism.

(b) Major life activities means functions such as caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning and working.

(c) Has a record of such an impairment means has a history of, or has been misclassified as having, a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

Do you need the Emotional Support Animal to provide assistance and support that alleviates at least one symptom or effect of the disability?

□   Yes, the Emotional Support Animal is needed to assist with the disability in the following way:

                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                               

□   I have attached a letter from a physician, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional verifying the existence of the disability and documenting that the animal is necessary and that it provides support that alleviates at least one of the identified symptoms or effects of the disability.

******************************************************************************

Dennis Fuller is a property manager of vacation & short term rentals, long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area and Tallahassee and you can view his blog at www.cpservices.net/blog/.

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Recent Visit To Fairhope, Alabama

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

I attended a funeral last Saturday in Fairhope, Alabama and afterward had a chance to walk around their beautiful little town.

The thought came to me – why can’t we do something like this in Panama City.

I guess there are some people who don’t want any more visitors and who don’t like the tourism business but hey, I love tourism and I think it would be great for Panama City.

How was Fairhope able to get three or four square blocks to form into a great little shopping experience with wonderful small local gift shops and restaurants?

Was it a vision of someone?  Was it zoning?  Did a group get together and plan it out?

An area of Key West turned into something like this after the cruise ships added them as a port.   In fact, many of the cruise ship ports have small areas sort of like this.  Maybe it’s a chicken and the egg type of thing.  Maybe we need the cruise ship number of people to make it work.

Regardless of how they did it, how can we do it?

We have a couple of areas that might work.  The St. Andrews area looks good.  The Harrison Avenue area looks good.  Maybe we can develop the old Miracle Strip land into a “Spice Market” shopping area type of thing.

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Who Needs A License To Manage Vacation Rentals or Long Term Rentals In Florida & Which Florida Statutes Apply When?

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

Recently I did some research on who needs a license to manage short term rentals, who needs a license to manage long term rentals, who needs a license to manage associations, and which statutes apply when and I thought I would share my findings.   I am not an attorney so if you want or need legal advice you should consult an attorney.

I manage vacation rentals, long term rentals, and associations in Panama City Beach.  My company has a corporate Real Estate Brokers license and I have a Real Estate Broker’s license.  My company also has a Community Association Managers Firm license and I have a Community Association Managers license.  In addition, my company has a Collective Resort Management License for scattered vacation rentals and several Group Resort Management Licenses for vacation rentals.  Sometimes, I feel like I am license poor as I also have a Certified Building Contractors License and not too long ago I was spraying Round Up on some grass and someone stopped by to tell me I needed a license to do that – so now I also have a Limited Lawn and Ornamental Pest Control License too.

Real Estate Managers like myself run into several chapters of the Florida Statutes from time to time including:

Chapter 83, Part II, Residential Tenancies
Chapter 509, Part I, Public Lodging
Chapter 468, Part VIII, Community Association Management
Chapter 475, Part I, Real Estate Brokers

The main thing that decides which statute applies to a rental seems to be if the rental meets the definition of transient occupancy.

Chapter 83, Part II
There are no licenses required under Chapter 83.  Chapter 83 is known as the Florida Residential Landlord and Tenant Act and it applies to the rental of dwelling units.  Transient occupancy in a hotel, condominium, motel, rooming house, mobile home park, or similar public lodging, is excluded from Chapter 83. Chapter 83 defines “transient occupancy” as occupancy when it is the intention of the parties that the occupancy will be temporary.

Chapter 83 clearly applies to most long-term rentals if the rental unit will be the sole residence of the tenant and the rental is not temporary.  The deciding factor seems to be what was the intention of the parties for the occupancy and whether the intention was temporary.

Most vacation rentals should meet the definition of transient occupancy.  If a Guest comes down for the July 4th week, it is clearly transient.  If a Northern Guest comes down and rents for 60 or 90 days and this is not their sole residence, then I think they are transient.  Also, if a couple decides to rent for 30 days while they look for a permanent house to buy or rent, this seems to be transient.  However, if someone comes in and rents for a few months and does not appear to have any other home or place to go when the term is up, they are probably not transient and their rental is probably subject to Chapter 83.

If Chapter 83 applies then there are specific sections that apply to how a security deposit is handled and how a landlord can evict a tenant.

Chapter 468, Part VIII
Chapter 468 regulates Managers of homeowner and condominium associations in Florida.  A company and an individual manager must be licensed if they are responsible for the management of more than 10 units or if the association being managed has an annual budget of more than $100,000.  You must have a license if for remuneration, you control or disburse funds of an association, prepare budgets or other financial documents for an association, assist in the noticing or conduct of association meetings, coordinate maintenance for the association, and other day-to-day services involved with the operation of an association.

Chapter 475, Part I
Chapter 475 regulates Real Estate Brokers and Sales Associates in Florida.  A company that acts as a Broker must register and get a license and any individual acting as a Broker, Broker Associate, or Sales Associate must also register and get a license.  You must have a license if you for compensation, rent or lease real property of another or offer or hold out to the public that you are engaged in the business of renting or leasing, or procure owners, tenants, or lessees for these activities.

There are a few exemptions to Chapter 475 including “Any person, partnership, corporation, or other legal entity which, for another and for compensation or other valuable consideration, rents or advertises for rent, for transient occupancy, any public lodging establishment licensed under Chapter 509.”

If you are managing or renting for an Owner a vacation rental for transient occupancy and that vacation rental is licensed under Chapter 509 then a Real Estate broker’s license does not appear to be required.

Some Rental Agents who normally rent short term vacation rentals can run into problems if they rent one of those rentals for a year and do not have a Broker’s license.

Some other exemptions to Chapter 475 are “any salaried employee ~ who works in an onsite rental office of an apartment community in a leasing capacity” and “any person employed for a salary as a manager of a condominium community ~ if rentals arranged by the person are for periods no greater than 1 year.”

Chapter 509, Part I
All vacation rental units are required to be licensed under Chapter 509.  The individual or company managing the vacation rental is not required to have a license under this chapter; however, the actual vacation rental unit itself is required to be licensed.

Chapter 509 applies to Public Lodging Establishments and includes both transient public lodging establishments and non-transient public lodging establishments.

Chapter 509 requires each public lodging establishment to obtain a license and the license classifications include “Vacation rental” and “Non-transient apartment or rooming house”.  A license for a vacation rental is required for only one rental unit; however a license for a non-transient apartment or rooming house is only required if there are five or more units in the establishment.

Some of the sections of Chapter 509 Part I apply to both transient and non-transient rentals and some sections apply to only transient rentals.  Most of the sections that apply to transient rentals only are much more in favor of the operator or landlord than some of the sections of Chapter 83 which are much more in favor of the tenant.  These operator friendly sections apply to transient occupancy which Chapter 509 defines as:  “occupancy when it is the intention of the parties that the occupancy will be temporary ~ when the dwelling unit occupied is not the sole residence of the guest, the occupancy is transient.”

Some of these “Operator Friendly” sections include: “operators right to eject undesirable guests” and “operators right to lock out the guests from the guest’s rental unit until payment arrangements have been made”.

In summary, it does not appear that you or your company needs to be licensed for vacation rentals for temporary occupancy; however, those vacation rental units themselves do need to be licensed under Chapter 509 even if it is only one unit.  If you are managing associations you need a license under Chapter 468.  If you are managing long term rentals and are not an on-site manager of a condominium or apartment community, then you need a real estate brokers license under Chapter 475.

Dennis Fuller is a local property manager of vacation rentals in the Thomas Drive area and long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area and you can view his blog at www.cpservices.net/blog/.

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Can the Board of Directors of a Florida Condominium Association Vote By Email?

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

I am a CAM Manager of condominium associations in Panama City Beach, Florida.  My Company took over the management of a small condominium association in Panama City Beach a few months ago and I recently attended my first Board Meeting.

During the meeting, the Board discussed an exterior painting project which was on the agenda.  There were three proposals from painting contractors; however, there were some differences and the proposals were not exactly “apples to apples”.  One of the Board Members suggested that the Board just vote by email as soon as the question could be answered.

I spoke up to let the Board know that I was not aware of any way that the Board could easily vote by email.  One of the Board Members quickly let me know that it was ok because they do it all the time.

Can the Board vote by email?

The Florida Statutes in 718.112 (2)(c) say “Meetings of the board of administration at which a quorum of the members is present shall be open to all unit owners.”  If the Board Members are voting then it seems that they are having a meeting and I don’t see how the Owners could attend a meeting being held by email.

My opinion is that the Board cannot vote by email.  Votes by Board Members should only be counted if the Board Members are attending a properly noticed meeting in person or by speakerphone.

Dennis Fuller is a local property manager of vacation rentals in the Thomas Drive area of Panama City Beach and long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area and you can view his blog at www.cpservices.net/blog/.

 

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Panama City Beach Condominium Association Has Insurance Claim Denied Because of a Continuous Leak for More Than 14 Days

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

Recently one of the condominium associations in Panama City Beach we manage had an insurance claim denied.

After being gone on an extended trip one of our owners returned to find their condominium unit had incurred extensive damage from a leaking sewer line.  At first we thought – no problem – we’ll report to our insurance company and the owner can report it to their insurance company.

The damage was extensive and ended up totaling over $50,000 with over $13,000 being allocated to drywall and other items that are the responsibility of the Association.

The unit that incurred the damage is on the first floor and apparently up in the second floor unit a pipe that is attached to the bottom of the flange on the second floor unit’s toilet became unattached.  It appears that the toilet leaked each time it was flushed.  Normally, this would have been a two or three hundred dollar problem that any plumber could fix; however, in this case, the downstairs owner was on an extended trip and was gone for several months and no one noticed the problem until they returned.

We were all surprised to get a letter from the association’s insurance company saying that the claim had been denied.  To quote the insurance company “We will not pay for loss or damage caused by or resulting from continuous or repeated seepage or leakage of water, or the presence or condensation of humidity, moisture or vapor, that occurs over a period of 14 days or more.”

We haven’t totally given up and have hired a Public Adjuster to see if he can get the insurance company to reopen and pay the claim; however, even if this claim is eventually covered, the Association will be out the $5,000 deductible.

What can a condominium association and its individual homeowners do to protect themselves from this happening?

First, get the word out – Owners need to know that claims can be denied for “water leaks that occur over a period of 14 days or more”.  Second, Associations might consider passing a rule that requires that owners inspect or have their units inspected at least every 14 days or they accept the responsibility for the cost to repair any damage that is not paid by insurance.  The Florida Statutes already include something that says almost that:  FS 718.111(11)(j) “The association is not obligated to pay for reconstruction or repairs of property losses as a common expense if the property losses were known or should have been known to a unit owner and were not reported to the association until after the insurance claim of the association for that property was settled or resolved with finality, or denied because it was untimely filed.”

Please be careful, the Insurance Agent is telling us that most of the property insurance policies written in Florida contain the same basic language.

Dennis Fuller is a local property manager of vacation rentals in the Thomas Drive area and long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area and you can view his blog at www.cpservices.net/blog/.

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Is Your Florida Condominium Association Required by the ADA to Install a Pool Lift?

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

I attended a seminar last week offered by Cox Pools in Panama City Beach which focused on the Americans With Disabilities Act requirement that will take effect on March 15, 2012 which could possibly require some condominium associations to install lifts at their swimming pools.  I really appreciate Cox Pools organizing this seminar as no one else has put much effort into getting information out to property managers like myself; however, I left the seminar thinking that I needed to do some more research before placing an order for a lift.

Will your condominium association be required by the ADA to install a pool lift? After several hours of research on the Department of Justice’s website at http://www.ada.gov/, maybe not.

I am a property manager of condominium associations in the Panama City Beach, Florida area; I am not an attorney or an expert on the ADA so I am certainly not qualified to give anyone advice on whether your association is required to install a pool lift.  If you want or need legal advice to determine if you are subject to the ADA you should engage an attorney and not even read this.

If your association does not allow any short-term rentals of thirty days or less and your association does not include any commercial units and you do not rent out any of your common areas like the clubhouse or meeting room to the public, then you clearly do not meet the ADA’s definition of a “place of lodging” and you should not be required to install a pool lift.

If your association allows short-term rentals of thirty days or less then you should probably read on.

I started my research by visiting the Department of Justice’s website at http://www.ada.gov/ clicked on and printed out:

  1. Revised ADA Requirements: Accessible Pools-Means of Entry and Exit.
  2. Title III Technical Assistance Manual
  3. Revised Final Title III Rule: A Compilation of Regulatory Provisions and Guidance — Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and in Commercial Facilities (PDF).  This 266 page document had the best information.

After a little reading I could tell that Title III of the ADA does apply to private entities operating “a place of public accommodation”.  What is “a place of public accommodation”?  There are 12 categories and if you fall within one of these 12 categories then you fit the ADA’s definition of “a place of public accommodation”. The category that a condominium association could find itself falling in is “places of public lodging”.

The updated definition of “places of public lodging” which can be found on page 32 of the 266 page document is:

“(1) Place of lodging, except for an establishment located within a facility that contains not more than five rooms for rent or hire and that actually is occupied by the proprietor of the establishment as the residence of the proprietor. For purposes of this part, a facility is a “place of lodging” if it is –

(i) An inn, hotel, or motel; or

(ii) A facility that –

(A) Provides guest rooms for sleeping for stays that primarily are short-term in nature (generally 30 days or less) where the occupant does not have the right to return to a specific room or unit after the conclusion of his or her stay; and

(B) Provides guest rooms under conditions and with amenities similar to a hotel, motel, or inn, including the following –

(1) On- or off-site management and reservations service;

(2) Rooms available on a walk-up or call-in basis;

(3) Availability of housekeeping or linen service; and

(4) Acceptance of reservations for a guest room type without guaranteeing a particular unit or room until check-in, and without a prior lease or security deposit.”

If you don’t fit into paragraph (ii)(A) and there are no short-term stays of thirty days or less at your association, then you do not meet the ADA’s definition of a “place of lodging” and you are not covered by its requirements.

If your association allows short-term stays of thirty days or less, then you might be considered a “place of lodging” if you meet 1-4 of paragraph (ii)(B).

To get a little clarification, I called the ADA Information Line at 800-514-0301 and I was surprised at how quickly I was able to speak with a real human.  In addition, the lady on the other end of the phone line was helpful and nice.  I told her that I managed condominium associations and some of the units were rented for less than thirty days and I wanted to know if my association met the definition under paragraph (B) numbers (1) and (2) but did not meet the definition of numbers (3) and (4) would it be considered a place of lodging.  I believe I heard her say that a facility would have to meet the definition of numbers (1)-(4) to be considered a place of public lodging.  I also asked her if the association had units that were considered a place of public lodging would the facility be covered by the ADA even though the individual units are exempt from the removal of barriers section.  She answered yes the facility is covered by the ADA if any of its units are considered to be places of public lodging and only the guest rooms themselves are exempt.

Many of the condominium vacation rentals around Panama City Beach are managed by off-site management and reservation services.  Several of the larger condominium associations have on-site management and reservation services which are either operated directly by the association or an office area is made available to a real estate company.  These on-site offices usually advertise and accept rentals on a walk-up basis.   Most of the rental agreements that I have seen for the rental of condominium units in the Panama City Beach area include clean linens at check-in but do not offer daily housekeeping or linen changes like a hotel or motel.  Also, most rentals do require a prior rental agreement and a security deposit; however, many of the rental agreements being used include some type of clause saying that the manager is not guaranteeing the unit assignment.

The language in the ADA definition of a place of lodging that condominium associations need to look at carefully is:  “where the occupant does not have the right to return to a specific room or unit after the conclusion of his or her stay” and “Acceptance of reservations for a guest room type without guaranteeing a particular unit or room until check-in”.  What this says is, if a guest is guaranteed that he will get a certain unit and he has the right to book and return to a certain unit over and over, then that unit is not a place of lodging.  As I mentioned above, many of the rental agreements being used locally include some type of clause saying that the manager is not guaranteeing the unit assignment.  I really don’t know why that clause is included as in reality, because individual units are so different, I don’t think anyone ever changes the unit assignment without the agreement of the guest.

Some larger associations may find it easier to just be defined as a place of public lodging and comply with the ADA.  Some of the smaller associations may want to consider passing rules which make it clear that they do not meet the definition of a place of public lodging.  A possible rule may be something like:   Agreements between owners (or owner’s agents) and rental guests for short-term rentals of less than 30 days must be for a specific unit and the unit assignment cannot be changed without the consent of the Guest.

It appears to me that if your association has even one unit that is considered a place of lodging then your common areas are subject to the ADA.  On page 167 of the 266 page document, the DOJ says “The Department agrees that the scoping and technical standards applicable to transient lodging should apply to facilities that contain units that meet the definition of “places of lodging”.  On page 168, the DOJ says “Public use and common areas in facilities containing units subject to the ADA also must meet the 2010 Standards”.  This seems to make it clear that the common areas of the condominium associations must meet the technical standards if the association contains any units that are places of lodging.

What is interesting is that the actual guest rooms are exempt from much of the ADA requirements even though the facility is not exempt.  The 266 page document includes a summary of some of the comments and discussion and it appears that the writers of the ADA took into consideration the unfairness of one owner creating an expense for the association by renting short term even though there are other owners who do not rent short term.  However, they only applied the exemptions to the actual guest rooms and not the facility.

Even if you are not considered a place of lodging and your association includes commercial units and those commercial units are able to use the swimming pool or your association rents out any of the common areas like a clubhouse or meeting room to the public, then your association may be covered by other sections of Title III of the ADA and you may be required to install a pool lift.

Will your condominium association be required by the ADA to install a pool lift?  If you meet the definition of a place of public lodging, then yes.  If you do not meet the definition of a place of public lodging, then no.

Dennis Fuller is a local property manager of vacation rentals in the Thomas Drive area and long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area and you can view his blog at www.cpservices.net/blog/.

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Panama City Beach Florida Condominium Associations – Age Restrictions For Rental Guest

Posted on by Dennis Fuller

In the Panama City Beach, Florida area, it is now common for condominium associations to have rules which require a rental guest to be 25 years or older.  The typical rule says something like “The primary guest must be 25 years of age or older and must occupy the rental property during the entire term of the reservation”.  In fact in the Thomas Drive area, where most of the rental units that I manage are located, I only know of two condominium associations that do not have such a rule.

Are these rules a good idea and what is the desired result?

Obviously, these rules are trying to control the spring break college crowds that for many years have visited Panama City Beach in March.  Board Members and association managers are tired of cleaning up puke in the elevators, picking up beer cans and red cups from the landscaping, and dealing with noise and craziness in the middle of the night.

These rules appear to try to require adult supervision and eliminate younger rental guests.  The rules are trying to reduce the number of unsupervised younger rental guests in hopes that more family oriented “normal” guests will fill up the condominiums instead. The problem is that the spring break for college-age guests comes earlier than the spring break for families with school-age children and most owners are worried that if they don’t accept college-age guests their units will sit vacant.

As an association manager, I have had my share of clean up duty behind some of this craziness but are these rules really working?

I really can’t say that I’ve seen any less beer cans, red cups, or noise and craziness and why is that?  One reason is that the crowds of unsupervised younger guests are still coming during spring break.  I follow the rules; however, there are apparently many condominium owners who simply don’t go by the rules and rent their unit to whomever they want.  In addition, the rules don’t apply to relatives or non-rental guests of owners so an owner’s college-age children and their friends are not subject to the rules. Also, every rental manager has a story about where a parent paid for the stay, came down and checked-in and said they would be in the unit, and then quietly hopped in their car and drove back home to leave their children here alone.

No one seems to have gotten the message to our Tourist Development Council that most of our Associations have these rules as they continue to promote and advertise to a young college crowd even though there are only a few places where this young college crowd can actually rent.  Most of the rental managers are overwhelmed with hundreds or even thousands of inquiries from frustrated rental prospects that we can’t help.

The rules should try to eliminate public intoxication and the craziness that goes with it and the lack of respect for public and private property.   Is there a better way to eliminate the unwanted parts of spring break and not have to eliminate all young guests?  I don’t know.  I am personally not opposed to all college-age guests and for many years I have managed student oriented apartment communities around some of the largest universities in the Southeast and I am convinced that there must be a way to rent to some college-age guests and avoid the craziness.  My feeling is that eight out of ten college-age guests that visit Panama City have a great time and don’t cause any problems.  But, because the two college-age guests that do cause problems, cause a lot of problems, we feel like spring break is totally out of control. There must be some way to control the two bad apples and not “throw out the baby with the bath water”.

I am hoping you have some ideas.

Dennis Fuller is a local property manager of vacation rentals in the Thomas Drive area and long term rentals, condominium associations, and apartment communities in the Panama City area .

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